Ohio statue committee recommends Thomas Edison

August 27, 2010 by EVE   · Comments Off

No surprise:

Committee recommends Thomas Edison for new Ohio statue in Washington

By William Hershey | Thursday, August 26, 2010, 02:56 PM

By a unanimous 6-0 vote, a special legislative committee on Thursday, Aug. 26, recommended that inventor Thomas Edison represent Ohio on a new statute in Statuary Hall in Washington, D.C.

Rep. Thomas Letson, D-Warren, initially passed but then cast his vote for Edison to make it a unanimous selection. Letson said after the meeting that his first choice was the Wright brothers, the aviation pioneers from Dayton. He said, however, he wanted the committee’s choice to be unanimous. …continue reading

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Ohio voters choose another man for Statuary Hall

July 10, 2010 by EVE   · 2 Comments »

Sorry, we couldn’t resist. Here’s the press release from the Ohio Historical Society:

Ohioans Choose Edison for National Statuary Hall

Edison(COLUMBUS, OHIO) -On behalf of the National Statuary Collection Study Committee, the Ohio Historical Society announces that inventor Thomas A. Edison was the top vote-getter for Ohio’s representative to National Statuary Hall Collection in the U.S. Capitol.

From March 20 to June 12, more than 46,000 Ohioans statewide cast ballots for one of 10 nominees for whom they thought should stand for Ohio in Washington, D.C. Of the total, Edison received 14,261 votes, followed by the Wright Brothers with 13,363 votes and Jesse Owens with 4,921 votes, according to Burt Logan, executive director and CEO of the Ohio Historical Society.

“The response to the popular vote was extraordinary,” Logan said. “Ohioans of all ages and from every region of the state took this opportunity to tell state legislators who they want to represent the state in National Statuary Hall and Thomas Edison, world-famous inventor born in Milan, Ohio, is the people’s choice.”

The public vote isn’t binding, but most of the news reports in Ohio seem to be taking it as given that Edison will be the state’s new statue. …continue reading

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Are the Wright Brothers the Right Choice for Ohio?

birth_of_aviation

The polling in Ohio has come to a close, and now it’s time for six members of the Ohio state legislature to decide who is the right choice to represent Ohio in National Statuary Hall. Two of the final candidates are Wilbur and Orville Wright, credited with the first flight. Their remarkable achievement is memorialized in a frieze in the Capitol Rotunda called “The Birth of Aviation.” This frieze is one of nineteen friezes that surround the dome of the Rotunda. Only one of the nineteen friezes depicts a recognizable woman, Pocahontas.

The Wright Brothers are also recognized on the reverse of two quarters in the new state quarter series. The quarters from Ohio and North Carolina both honor the Wright Brothers. The quarter from only one state (Alabama) commemorates the achievements of a woman, that woman being Helen Keller.

ohio-state-quarternorth-carolina-state-quarter

The contributions of the Wright Brothers were significant, but they have already been honored in the U.S. Capitol and on our nation’s currency. It’s time for Ohio to grant visibility to one of the other candidates for National Statuary Hall. Ohio’s National Statuary Committee has the power to make the world different for the next generation of girls. I hope they put a woman in National Statuary Hall.

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If a picture is worth a thousand words…

June 18, 2010 by EVE   · Comments Off

…maybe this poster will be worth at least one statue!

nsh_poster_1600

That’s the poster we had made up and shipped to the members of the statue committee in Ohio this week. See our press release for the full details.

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Dayton Daily News cartoon

June 17, 2010 by EVE   · Comments Off

Great cartoon from Mike Peters for the Dayton Daily News:

cartoon_peters

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Senator Teresa Fedor casts vote for Ohio statue

June 14, 2010 by EVE   · 1 Comment »

Senator Teresa Fedor explains why she cast her vote for Harriet Beecher Stowe to represent Ohio in National Statuary Hall:

…continue reading

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Voters select famous Ohioan for Statuary Hall

June 12, 2010 by EVE   · 2 Comments »

Coverage of the 10 Ohio finalists from WKYC in Cleveland. At about 1:18, Kim Schuette of the Ohio Historical Society points out that there are only 9 women in Statuary Hall.

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The last day of voting in Ohio

June 12, 2010 by Suzanne Scoggins, Director of Women's History   · Comments Off

Today was the last day of voting in Ohio for the statue to replace Governor William Allen in National Statuary Hall. This article in the Springfield News-Sun sums it up:

Voting for Ohio statue closes Saturday

Ohioans have until Saturday, June 12, to vote for a new statue that will represent their state in the U.S. Capitol’s Statuary Hall.

That’s when voting ends at the Statehouse in Columbus and 35 other sites affiliated with the Ohio Historical Society, including the Dunbar House in Dayton and the National Afro-American Museum and Cultural Center in Wilberforce.

Results will be announced in late July.

The state is seeking to replace the statue of William Allen, a 19th century congressman and governor who supported Southern slave owners and portrayed blacks as savages.

The Wright brothers, Milan inventor Thomas Edison and Cleveland athlete Jesse Owens are among the finalists.

Notice anything missing? Right. No mention of the three women finalists.

Fortunately, Martha Good (of the Harriet Beecher Stowe House) and David McClurkin posted comments to remedy the omission:

Harriet Beecher Stowe embodies the best values of Ohio. At a time when women were barred from voting and were not allowed to speak in public, Stowe’s book changed the minds of millions. Uncle Tom’s Cabin was rooted in her experience living in Ohio from 1832-1850 and it would never have been written had she not lived in Ohio. Of the finalists only Stowe has changed history and continues to be a leading international human rights figure who represents the very best of Ohio’s values.
Martha Good
8:57 PM, 6/11/2010

This story fails to mention one woman the Committee nominated who is a perfect antidote for the departing Governor Allen: Harriet Beecher Stowe. Her stories based on her Ohio experiences, first published in June 1851, demanded that the United States deliver on the promise of freedom and equality. Her standing there would honor the role Ohio played in the abolitionist movement, Underground Railroad, and the end of slavery in America. She fits right in with the other statues in the Statuary Hall.
dkmcclurkin
10:27 AM, 6/11/2010

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Press Coverage for the Women Candidates for NSH from Ohio

It started inauspiciously: a New York Times article published the day after Thanksgiving in 2009, reporting that Ohio was going to replace the statue of pro-slavery Governor Allen in National Statuary Hall with the statue of another famous Ohioan. Several suggestions were listed but not a single woman was mentioned.

The omission of women continued with a Newspapers in Education piece intended for students entitled, “Who should be Ohio’s next statue?” The piece written by history teacher Paul LaRue, and profiled five of the potential candidates from Ohio: the Wright Brothers, Dummy Hoy, James Ashley, Thomas Edison, and Jesse Owens. Obviously all of the candidates profiled were men.

Currently, there are ten finalists for Allen’s spot in National Statuary Hall. Three of these finalists are women: Harriet Beecher Stowe, Harriet Taylor Upton, and Judith Resnik. Newspaper coverage of the race for National Statuary Hall has been abundant. But few articles have profiled the women candidates, and little attention is paid them in pieces that discuss the race in general.

Finally someone has spoken up. Thanks to David McClurkin for noticing the paucity of women both in National Statuary Hall and in the newspaper coverage related to Ohio’s new statue:

Don’t slight women pioneers in Statuary Hall competition
Published: Wednesday, June 09, 2010

Ohio’s historic role in building the nation has included countless pioneering and pacesetting women. Why is this not seen in Statuary Hall?

The Plain Dealer’s disappointing failure to mention all but one of the three women nominees (Editorials, Saturday) illustrates a myopic view that overlooks representation of more than half the population. Ohio’s three women nominees’ lives spanned almost 175 years in our history, opening opportunities for America’s minorities and women to succeed.

By picking one of these three women — Judith Resnik, Harriet Beecher Stowe or Harriet Taylor Upton — Ohio could again be a trailblazer for undoing a still standing social ill: the lack of equal visibility for women as important role models for all our children and the public. Women were then and are still pioneers in America.

David K. McClurkin, Beachwood

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EVE’s Lynette Long quoted in Toledo Blade

June 2, 2010 by EVE   · 1 Comment »

Great article in the Toledo Blade by Jim Provance, who interviewed Dr. Long for the piece on how various groups have supported different candidates for the Ohio statue. Here’s the part with Lynette:

She lives in Washington, but Lynette Long of Equal Visibility Everywhere has pushed for Ohio to add a woman to the statuary hall.

Working with supporters in Ohio, the campaign has contacted women’s political groups, schools for girls, Girl Scouts, and other organizations in hopes of getting out the vote.

But she’s feeling a bit overwhelmed by Ohio State’s lobbying for Owens, the African-American track star whose 1936 Olympic gold medals in Berlin became a thumb in the eye to Adolf Hitler’s Aryan superiority propaganda.

Mr. Gee cast his vote for Owens on the first day of balloting at the historical society, and the university president engaged in a good-natured debate with the costumed women who were present to promote the three female candidates.

Ohio State also used the recent grand opening of its new Ohio Union to promote Owens.

“There’s a lot of competition,” Ms. Long said. “The fact is that Ohio State University is a public institution that gets federal and state money. I think it would be better if they educated the student body about all 10 candidates and let the students make an educated choice rather than push so hard for an [alumnus]. I find that disturbing.”

OSU spokesman Jim Lynch said Mr. Gee’s involvement is as much about promoting the vote in general as it was promoting Owens. He said the school is also behind McCulloch, another alumnus.

The “costumed women” is a reference to our living history presentation at the Ohio Historical Society, with interpreters in costume as Harriet Beecher Stowe, Judith Resnik, and Harriet Taylor Upton.

We’re into the last 10 days of voting, which is scheduled to end June 12. Wonder who will win?

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