A pedestal for Harriet Tubman

March 11, 2011 by EVE   · Comments Off

Published on March 11, 2011, in the Washington Post:

Perhaps it shouldn’t be surprising that there is such strong resistance from a small minority in Maryland’s General Assembly to replacing Revolutionary figure John Hanson’s statue in the U.S. Capitol ["Harriet Tubman vs. John Hanson: Statuary Hall Smackdown," Style, March 6]. As scholars who have spent our careers interpreting American history, we hope to shed some light on this issue.

Despite the claims of Hanson supporters – some of them Hanson family descendants – John Hanson was not an important Revolutionary figure, even in Maryland. …continue reading

Share this:
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • E-mail this story to a friend!
  • MySpace
  • Print this article!
  • Reddit
  • RSS
  • StumbleUpon
  • Yahoo! Buzz

Harriet Tubman Statue is Precisely about Race and Gender

March 8, 2011 by EVE   · Comments Off

Published on March 8, 2011, in Southern Maryland Online:

The Maryland legislature has a chance to select a new famous Marylander to stand in National Statuary Hall in our nation’s capitol. Currently, John Hanson and Charles Carroll, both colonial-era patriots, represent Maryland in National Statuary Hall. Since each state is only allowed two statues in National Statuary Hall the current bill to send a statue of Harriet Tubman to the U.S. Capitol would require the statue of John Hanson be returned to Annapolis. Senator Mike Miller is against the bill calling the effort “insane” and claiming the effort is rewriting history. …continue reading

Share this:
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • E-mail this story to a friend!
  • MySpace
  • Print this article!
  • Reddit
  • RSS
  • StumbleUpon
  • Yahoo! Buzz

Harriet Tubman’s Campaign for the Capitol

March 7, 2011 by EVE   · Comments Off

Published on March 7 by NBC:

In the Capitol building, marble and bronze statues of George Washington, Daniel Webster, and Brigham Young stand silent watch over the halls of power. Each state in the Union is allowed to contribute 2 statues to the collection, representing notable figures from history.

Of the 100 statues in the hall, there are only nine women, and no African-Americans.

This is “basically a white male view of history,” Linda Mahoney, president of the Md. chapter of the National Organization of Women, told the Washington Post.

A new bill to be considered in Maryland legislature this week aims to change that. Two women’s advocacy groups, Equal Visibility Everywhere and the Maryland chapter of the National Organization for Women, have lobbied Annapolis politicians to replace one of the current statues with one of Harriet Tubman. The bill has the support of Governor Martin O’Malley. …continue reading

Share this:
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • E-mail this story to a friend!
  • MySpace
  • Print this article!
  • Reddit
  • RSS
  • StumbleUpon
  • Yahoo! Buzz

Harriet Tubman vs. John Hanson: Statuary Hall smackdown

March 6, 2011 by EVE   · 1 Comment »

Published on March 5, 2011, in the Washington Post:

Harriet Tubman has history on her side. But does she have the votes?

The famous abolitionist is locked in a historical steel-cage match with the increasingly forgotten patriot John Hanson – one that’s playing out not far from John Hanson Highway in Annapolis, where Maryland lawmakers, historians and activists have been debating whether to refresh the state’s history by dumping Hanson in favor of Tubman.

At stake: one of 100 marble pedestals in the exclusive if not always accessible National Statuary Hall Collection at the U.S. Capitol.

For the past 108 years, Hanson, a leading advocate of American independence, has been honored at the Capitol with a larger-than-life statue that the public almost never sees. Wearing a tricorn hat, waistcoat, breeches and other colonial-era clothes, the old Southern Marylander’s 7-foot, 3-inch bronze likeness peers down at lawmakers and legislative aides rushing through a restricted-access corridor outside the Senate chamber.

Hanson was a member of the Continental Congress and in 1781 was elected as “President of the United States in Congress Assembled.” But as time marches on, he slips deeper into the margins of history, his legacy imperiled even in his home state.

“I don’t even know who he is,” Leslie Rowland admitted from College Park, where she teaches mid-19th-century American history at the University of Maryland. …continue reading

Share this:
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • E-mail this story to a friend!
  • MySpace
  • Print this article!
  • Reddit
  • RSS
  • StumbleUpon
  • Yahoo! Buzz

Statue debate has local significance

March 2, 2011 by EVE   · Comments Off

Published on March 2, 2011, in the Carroll County Times:

Harriet Tubman, one of Maryland’s historic black heroines, is much in today’s news.

Who, for certainty, knows of her Reisterstown connection?

Famed for her founding of the Underground Railroad by which she led dozens of slaves to freedom, Tubman recently has been proposed as a swap for John Hanson as a Maryland representative in the National Statuary Hall Collection of the United States Capitol.

The famed “railroad,” I’ve heard over the years, had a safe house in Reisterstown. Various Reisterstown folk have related to me sketchy tidbits, such as: The Main Street house had a hidden room behind a fireplace; fleeing slaves were accommodated overnight then were sent with food and a little money to the next hideout on the secret network, etc. …continue reading

Share this:
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • E-mail this story to a friend!
  • MySpace
  • Print this article!
  • Reddit
  • RSS
  • StumbleUpon
  • Yahoo! Buzz

Politicians rising to the challenge — in other states

March 1, 2011 by EVE   · Comments Off

Published on March 1, 2011, in the Baltimore Sun:

Great leaders arise, Phoenix-like, from the ashes in these times. Winston Churchill spent eight years in the wilderness before being called to lead England during World War II. Harriet Tubman, who was born a slave in Dorchester County in 1822 (and whose statue may soon grace the U.S. Capitol), risked her life in Civil War times to bring dozens of captives to freedom through the Underground Railroad, later leading the civil rights and women’s suffrage movements.

Read the full editorial in the Baltimore Sun.

Share this:
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • E-mail this story to a friend!
  • MySpace
  • Print this article!
  • Reddit
  • RSS
  • StumbleUpon
  • Yahoo! Buzz

Tubman Would Not Have Liked This

March 1, 2011 by EVE   · Comments Off

Published on March 1, 2011, in the Underground Railroad Free Press:

Sponsors of a bill in the Maryland legislature did Harriet Tubman no favors when they recommended putting a statue of Tubman into National Statuary Hall at the expense of another Maryland hero already enshrined there. …continue reading

Share this:
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • E-mail this story to a friend!
  • MySpace
  • Print this article!
  • Reddit
  • RSS
  • StumbleUpon
  • Yahoo! Buzz

Are Black Women in History Overlooked? The Effort to Honor Harriet Tubman

February 28, 2011 by EVE   · Comments Off

Published on February 28, 2011, in the National Organization for Women blog:

Each February when Black History Month is observed, many feminists would agree that more attention should be paid to the intrepid black women who have made important contributions — not only for the benefit of their communities, but the nation as a whole. Foremost on our minds at the moment is abolitionist, Civil War spy, nurse, suffragist, humanitarian and Underground Railroad operator Harriet Ross Tubman (1822-1913). NOW activists and their allies are working to honor the life of this extraordinary woman, called the “Moses of her people,” but are encountering the usual pushback that often keeps women’s history — particularly that of African-American women — suppressed. …continue reading

Share this:
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • E-mail this story to a friend!
  • MySpace
  • Print this article!
  • Reddit
  • RSS
  • StumbleUpon
  • Yahoo! Buzz

Ousting John Hanson? Some legislators want prominent Frederick County historical figure to remain on view in a national hall

February 27, 2011 by EVE   · Comments Off

Published on February 27, 2011, in the Frederick News-Post:

ANNAPOLIS — He helped persuade Maryland to sign the Declaration of Independence, and later brokered a compromise on the western lands to secure states’ ratification of the Articles of Confederation.

One of Frederick County’s most well-known historic figures, John Hanson, is also one of two men honored by the state of Maryland with a statue placed in the National Statuary Hall of the U.S. Capitol.

After the articles were passed by the Second Continental Congress and ratified by the states, he served as the first president of the nation’s government when it was established — the United States and [sic] Congress Assembled.

Now, a proposal to replace the statue of Hanson in the U.S. Capitol with one honoring abolitionist Harriet Tubman has Frederick County’s state lawmakers raising objections.

“John Hanson was the president of our states before George Washington, and he was from Frederick County,” said Delegate Kathy Afzali, a Frederick County Republican who tried to stop the women’s caucus from supporting the proposal. “So yeah, I’m partial. Harriet Tubman, great lady, maybe there’s something else we can do to honor her.” …continue reading

Share this:
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • E-mail this story to a friend!
  • MySpace
  • Print this article!
  • Reddit
  • RSS
  • StumbleUpon
  • Yahoo! Buzz

Weekly News Quiz

February 25, 2011 by EVE   · Comments Off

Published on February 25, 2011, in the Baltimore Sun:

2. Lawmakers in Annapolis are proposing putting a statue of Harriet Tubman in the U.S. Capitol’s Statuary Hall in the place of what historic Marylander?

A. Samuel Chase
B. John Hanson
C. William Paca
D. Thomas Stone

See the full quiz in the Baltimore Sun.

Share this:
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • E-mail this story to a friend!
  • MySpace
  • Print this article!
  • Reddit
  • RSS
  • StumbleUpon
  • Yahoo! Buzz

« Previous PageNext Page »